Kettlebell Health & Fitness Benefits

The health & fitness benefits of Kettlebells are truly incredible as you’ll find out here. In a sense, these tools kb health
have it all and train the body completely by their design and form of exercise.

Originating in Russia and becoming very popular amongst Eastern European countries, they slowly made their way to the western world and are quickly rising up in the ranks of popularity.

Now regardless of their rise, their benefits have always existed and once you read through this page, you’ll know why they are way better than any exercise machine or dumbbell.

In addition, they are also perfect for women because their approach to exercise creates lean muscle mass, not bulky (unless you train with a very heavy ball, that being something you can barely lift).

Here are just some of the many health & fitness benefits you’ll get from these tools. Most of the information was gathered & quoted from here:

    • Full-body conditioning. “The body learns to work as one synergistic unit linked strongly together,” he says.
    • Big results by spending less time in the gym. “Because kettlebell training involves multiple muscle groups and energy systems at once.”
    • Increased resistance to injury.
    • The ability to work aerobically and anaerobically simultaneously.
    • Improved mobility and range of motion.
    • Increased strength without increase of mass. Kettlebell exercisers are lean and toned, not bulky—a benefit that appeals to women and men alike.
    • Enhanced performance in athletics and everyday functioning.
    • Major calorie burning. An average 20 minute kettle bell exercise yields about 272 calories burned as based on a 2010 ACE study. The top kettlebell workout program for women we recommend burns 2x as much. Learn how it does it here. Kb workout 2

 

A Sparkpeople.com article which listed most of the benefits found above called kettlebells the “Hottest Fitness Trend You Haven’t Heard Of”. And there is truth to that.

In that article, they quote a NSCA, IKFF & AOS certified kettlebell trainer Henry Marshall who says these tools are one of the most efficient exercise tools you can use.

Henry states in that article that these tools appeal to all fitness levels and ages and genders. Henry goes on to say that the fitness industry somewhere along the line lost sight of what being fit truly meant and replaced full body exercises such as the ones which kettle balls provide with isolation exercises. This is a paraphrase.

What Henry says has a lot of truth to it. Walk into any gym or speak with many seemingly built individuals. From my personal experience these people train via isolation exercises or say things such as “I’m working this today”, this being some specific part of their body.

It makes sense for the fitness industry to do things this way. There is way more money to be made if you have many different machines instead of saying you can pretty much get it all from one tool: The kettle ball. It gives people the impression they are necessary and makes them want to come. Variety is attractive after all.

I doubt anyone would go to a gym with no machines, no treadmills, just a kettlebell. But the whole point is here is that most of these machines that isolate certain parts of the part instead of providing a total body workout. This makes them unnecessary and perhaps even a waste of time, space and money, for the customer at least.

If you still have any doubts about the health & fitness benefits of these tools, just do a Google search for their health benefits and you’ll find PLENTY! I’ve personally been working with them ever since I tried Kettlebell Kickboxing. They are an incredible and probably the most major part of my workout routine

Want to experience all the benefits of kettlebells and get the dream body you’ve always wanted? Try the #1 kettlebell workout and see results in 21 days!

Learn more here!

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.